What Crohns and Colitis Awareness Week Means to Me

My name is and I have lived with and Crohn’s disease for 25 years. Despite this , I have a fortunate career as the lead of , a , and am an — along with my wife — for people struggling with these same diseases.

The symptoms of my illness began in 1987 when I was 21 years-old, struggling to make it as a rock musician in Los Angeles. After experiencing terrible abdominal pain, I went to the bathroom and found (warning: not pretty) bloody mucus in the toilet. Shortly thereafter, I was diagnosed with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). I decided to put my musical dreams on hold and move back to Seattle. Depression ensued and it took me six months before I could pick up a guitar again, but I did (thanks to a particularly killer Stevie Ray Vaughn concert). Two years later, Pearl Jam was formed and our career took off.

What Crohns and Colitis Awareness Week Means to Me

What and Colitis Week Means to Me

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What Crohn’s and Colitis Awareness Week Means to Me
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My name is Mike McCready and I have lived with ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease for 25 years. Despite this diagnosis, I have a fortunate career as the lead guitarist of Pearl Jam, a beautiful family, and am an advocate — along with my wife and more »

About Rob Hill

In 1994, Rob was a fit, healthy 23-year-old, an amateur runner and athlete. Until that time, he had never really been sick. He didn’t even have a regular doctor. When the illness started, it progressed rapidly. Daily diarrhea. Sustained stomach cramps. The diagnosis was Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract. It got worse, and his weight plummeted from 185 to 105 pounds. After a year and a half, it became clear that his large intestine, his colon, needed to be removed. Rob decided he had to do something about it. The Seven Summits campaign, which we call “No Guts Know Glory” grew from Rob’s love of sport, adventure and the outdoors. By taking it to the extreme, and on a global basis, Rob hopes to show people everywhere that having these diseases or having an ostomy, like Rob does, shouldn’t stop you from leading a full life. You may not be able to climb mountains, but there are so many other things you can do. To further this goal, Rob started the Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society (IDEAS), from his home base in Vancouver, British Columbia.

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