Tips for student dealing with Crohns disease., SEATTLE — Heading back to school can stir up anxiety in any child, especially those dealing with a health issue. For children with , stepping foot in a classroom can be downright terrifying.

“They’re afraid the things they fear the most will happen at school,” said Teresa Wachs, a nurse at ’s Hospital.

To calm their concerns, Wachs has offered several tips to parents of children with .

In the estimated 1.4 million people who suffer from IBD, including Crohn’s and , the becomes swollen and inflamed, causing , diarrhea, fever and nausea. The disease most commonly occurs in people ages 15 to 30, though it can occur in children as young as 2 years old.

Unlike other , such as , students with IBD don’t typically want their peers to know about the condition.

“They’re worried about their friends asking them about all the time or why they take certain medications,” Wachs said.

IBD symptoms also tend to increase with stress, so if a child is anxious at school they are more likely to experience painful or embarrassing effects.

But Wachs said being proactive can help kids and teens avoid these issues.

“It’s important for parents to partner with the school and educate staff,” Wachs said. “It takes away some of that worry and makes kids look forward to going to school, rather than being anxious and missing days.”

Here are some of Wachs’ tips. See them all on Seattle Children’s Hospital blog “On the Pulse.”

Tips for student dealing with Crohns disease

 

 

About Robert Hill

I founded IDEAS Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society, from my home base in Vancouver, British Columbia. Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society IDEAS is established to raise public awareness of intestinal diseases in order to help remove the stigmas associated with these illnesses. The programs of IDEAS help children, youth and young adults learn to live full lives, find acceptance and gain confidence.

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