of Medicine Scope

I was presenting on at a recently when one of my co-panelists, a patient blogger, made reference to the fact that he once explored the use of to treat his Crohn’s Disease. (Boy, did that ever get the audience’s attention!) I was interested, then, to come across a Nature piece (subscription required) on the topic; in it, Tufts University , MD, discusses worms’ effects on the immune system and how infecting certain patients with them might actually help their health. He also shares the epiphany he had one day in the mid-90s, when pondering why “once-rare diseases, caused by ” have become relatively common:

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Stanford School of Medicine
Scope (blog)
I was presenting on blogging at a medical conference recently when one of my co-panelists, a patient blogger, made reference to the fact that he once explored the use of parasitic worms to treat his Crohn’s Disease. (Boy, did that ever get the audience

About Rob Hill

In 1994, Rob was a fit, healthy 23-year-old, an amateur runner and athlete. Until that time, he had never really been sick. He didn’t even have a regular doctor. When the illness started, it progressed rapidly. Daily diarrhea. Sustained stomach cramps. The diagnosis was Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract. It got worse, and his weight plummeted from 185 to 105 pounds. After a year and a half, it became clear that his large intestine, his colon, needed to be removed. Rob decided he had to do something about it. The Seven Summits campaign, which we call “No Guts Know Glory” grew from Rob’s love of sport, adventure and the outdoors. By taking it to the extreme, and on a global basis, Rob hopes to show people everywhere that having these diseases or having an ostomy, like Rob does, shouldn’t stop you from leading a full life. You may not be able to climb mountains, but there are so many other things you can do. To further this goal, Rob started the Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society (IDEAS), from his home base in Vancouver, British Columbia.

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