Spotlight on ,

Crohn’s disease and are incurable of the intestinal tract. Both diseases have similar symptoms but are different in the manner in which they affect the digestive tract. Each disease also has different surgical options and may be treated with a spectrum of diverse medications. The most common symptoms of (IBD) include, but are not limited to, abdominal pain, weight loss, fever, rectal bleeding, skin and eye irritations, and diarrhea.

Q: What kinds of programs and services do you provide?

Since our founding more than four decades ago, has remained at the forefront of research in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Today we fund cutting-edge studies at major medical institutions, nurture investigators at the early stages of their careers, and finance underdeveloped areas of research. In addition, our educational workshops and programs, along with our scientific journal, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, enable medical professionals to keep pace with this rapidly growing field. We are very proud that the National Institutes of Health has commended us for “uniting the research community and strengthening IBD research.”

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Good Deeds: Spotlight on Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America, Maryland

Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are incurable chronic diseases of the intestinal tract. Both diseases have similar symptoms but are different in the manner in which they affect the digestive tract. Each disease also has different surgical
“Guys & Guts,” A Dinner and Education Evening Garden City News all 3 news articles »

About Rob Hill

In 1994, Rob was a fit, healthy 23-year-old, an amateur runner and athlete. Until that time, he had never really been sick. He didn’t even have a regular doctor. When the illness started, it progressed rapidly. Daily diarrhea. Sustained stomach cramps. The diagnosis was Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract. It got worse, and his weight plummeted from 185 to 105 pounds. After a year and a half, it became clear that his large intestine, his colon, needed to be removed. Rob decided he had to do something about it. The Seven Summits campaign, which we call “No Guts Know Glory” grew from Rob’s love of sport, adventure and the outdoors. By taking it to the extreme, and on a global basis, Rob hopes to show people everywhere that having these diseases or having an ostomy, like Rob does, shouldn’t stop you from leading a full life. You may not be able to climb mountains, but there are so many other things you can do. To further this goal, Rob started the Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society (IDEAS), from his home base in Vancouver, British Columbia.

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