Speaking Up About Uncomfortable Condition

Speaking Up About Uncomfortable Condition, Bowels, especially those that don’t function properly, are not a popular topic of conversation. Most of the 1.4 million Americans and 15,000 Canadians with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis suffer in silence.

But scientists are making exciting progress in understanding the causes of these conditions and in developing more effective therapies. And affected individuals have begun to speak up to let others know that they are not alone.

Abby Searfoss, 21, who just graduated from the University of Connecticut, shared her story not in a support group, but online. She was a high school senior in Ridgefield, Conn., when she became ill. After she researched her symptoms on the Internet, she realized that, like her father, she had developed Crohn’s disease.

Her father had been very ill, losing 40 pounds, spending weeks in the hospital and undergoing surgery. Soon after Ms. Searfoss’s own diagnosis, her two younger sisters learned that they, too, had the condition.

In Crohn’s disease, the immune system attacks cells in the digestive tract, most often the end of the small intestine and first part of the colon, or large intestine. Sufferers may experience bouts of , cramps and diarrhea, often accompanied by poor appetite, fatigue and anxiety.

Read:  Speaking Up About Uncomfortable Condition

 

 

 

About Robert Hill

I founded IDEAS Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society, from my home base in Vancouver, British Columbia. Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society IDEAS is established to raise public awareness of intestinal diseases in order to help remove the stigmas associated with these illnesses. The programs of IDEAS help children, youth and young adults learn to live full lives, find acceptance and gain confidence.

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