Scientists have long puzzled over why “bad” bacteria such as E. coli can thrive in the guts of those with (IBD), causing serious diarrhea. Now UC Davis researchers have discovered the answer one that may be the first step toward finding new and better treatments for IBD.

The researchers discovered a by which harmful bacteria grow, edge out beneficial bacteria and damage the gut in IBD. This new understanding, published in the Feb. 8 issue of Science, may help researchers develop new treatments for IBD with fewer side effects than current therapies.

Read Full Article

Scientists Find Key to Growth of 'Bad' Bacteria in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Science Daily (press release)
It's estimated that IBD, which includes and Crohn's disease, affects 1.4 million people in the U.S., according to the . In test-tube and animal studies, the researchers found that potentially

and more »

About Rob Hill

In 1994, Rob was a fit, healthy 23-year-old, an amateur runner and athlete. Until that time, he had never really been sick. He didn’t even have a regular doctor. When the illness started, it progressed rapidly. Daily diarrhea. Sustained stomach cramps. The diagnosis was Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract. It got worse, and his weight plummeted from 185 to 105 pounds. After a year and a half, it became clear that his large intestine, his colon, needed to be removed. Rob decided he had to do something about it. The Seven Summits campaign, which we call “No Guts Know Glory” grew from Rob’s love of sport, adventure and the outdoors. By taking it to the extreme, and on a global basis, Rob hopes to show people everywhere that having these diseases or having an ostomy, like Rob does, shouldn’t stop you from leading a full life. You may not be able to climb mountains, but there are so many other things you can do. To further this goal, Rob started the Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society (IDEAS), from his home base in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Leave a Reply