Running Relieves Crohns Disease Pain for Seccurro

, W.Va. — With the pain of running comes healing for ’s .

Seccurro, diagnosed with Crohn’s disease more than 18 months ago, finds relief from his illness and in his mind in one of the most grueling sports.

Seccurro, a Redskins senior, will compete in his final race at the State Meet on Saturday at in Ona.

For Seccurro, the race marks a personal accomplishment, battling back from an that left him gravely ill.

Along the path to recovery, Seccurro’s been , and other medicines, but running has been his No. 1 treatment.

“He will be on medication the rest of his life, but we’re just so thankful there’s a medication for him,” Drake’s mother said. “We’re just praying he’ll continue to live a healthy life, and again the biggest thing with cross country, we truly, in the family, believe the running is just as much a drug or treatment fighting the Crohn’s as the Remicade or any other prescribed medication is.”

Long road to diagnosis

Drake’s first began to feel ill during his sophomore in 2010.

Prep cross country: Running relieves pain for Seccurro
Daily Mail – Charleston
Advertiser. CHARLESTON, W.Va. — With the pain of running comes healing for Hurricane’s Drake Seccurro. Seccurro, diagnosed with Crohn’s disease more than 18 months ago, finds relief from his illness and in his mind in one of the most grueling sports.

About Rob Hill

In 1994, Rob was a fit, healthy 23-year-old, an amateur runner and athlete. Until that time, he had never really been sick. He didn’t even have a regular doctor. When the illness started, it progressed rapidly. Daily diarrhea. Sustained stomach cramps. The diagnosis was Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract. It got worse, and his weight plummeted from 185 to 105 pounds. After a year and a half, it became clear that his large intestine, his colon, needed to be removed. Rob decided he had to do something about it. The Seven Summits campaign, which we call “No Guts Know Glory” grew from Rob’s love of sport, adventure and the outdoors. By taking it to the extreme, and on a global basis, Rob hopes to show people everywhere that having these diseases or having an ostomy, like Rob does, shouldn’t stop you from leading a full life. You may not be able to climb mountains, but there are so many other things you can do. To further this goal, Rob started the Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society (IDEAS), from his home base in Vancouver, British Columbia.

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