A drug currently on the market to treat leukemia reversed symptoms of colitis in lab tests, according to recently published findings by medical researchers with the University of Alberta.

Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry researcher Shairaz Baksh published his team’s discovery in the peer-reviewed journal, PLOS ONE.

His team discovered that a tumour-suppressor gene can also play an important role in the development of colitis. When this gene quits working or is missing, the inflammation process is triggered and the body loses its ability to repair damaged colon tissue. This leads to severe discomfort and poor recovery following bouts of inflammation. Persistent inflammation is prevalent in (such as Crohn’s disease and ).

Baksh and his team wondered if they could interfere with the inflammation process and encourage the body to repair the damaged tissue, so the disease would be less severe and patients could recover more quickly from any flare-ups. The team used a leukemia drug (imatinib/gleevec) that has been on the market for years to treat normal mice and mice that were missing the tumour-suppressor gene.

New Treatment for Colitis UAlberta Medical Research

About Robert Hill

I founded IDEAS Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society, from my home base in Vancouver, British Columbia. Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society IDEAS is established to raise public awareness of intestinal diseases in order to help remove the stigmas associated with these illnesses. The programs of IDEAS help children, youth and young adults learn to live full lives, find acceptance and gain confidence.

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