Robin Kingham is a former Reporter-Telegram employee who raises money for the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America through the Team Challenge program. This year she has signed up for two half-marathons and is serving as a mentor for both. For more information or to make a donation text DONATE to 37332. All donations are 100 percent tax deductible.

Did you know today 88 people will find out they have either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis? According to the Center for Disease Control’s website, www.cdc.gov, “IBD is one of the five most prevalent gastrointestinal disease burdens in the United States, with an overall health care cost of more than $1.7 billion. This chronic condition is without a medical cure and commonly requires a lifetime of care. Each year in the United States, IBD accounts for more than 700,000 physician visits, 100,000 hospitalizations and disability in 119,000 patients. Over the long term, up to 75 percent of patients with Crohn’s disease and 25 percent of those with ulcerative colitis will require surgery.”

Read more: More people face IBD diagnosis every day – Mywesttexas.com: West Texas Living http://www.mywesttexas.com/life/article_21ee352d-553d-5d46-ad88-a901781684a6.html#ixzz2MawNPjhm
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About Rob Hill

In 1994, Rob was a fit, healthy 23-year-old, an amateur runner and athlete. Until that time, he had never really been sick. He didn’t even have a regular doctor. When the illness started, it progressed rapidly. Daily diarrhea. Sustained stomach cramps. The diagnosis was Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract. It got worse, and his weight plummeted from 185 to 105 pounds. After a year and a half, it became clear that his large intestine, his colon, needed to be removed. Rob decided he had to do something about it. The Seven Summits campaign, which we call “No Guts Know Glory” grew from Rob’s love of sport, adventure and the outdoors. By taking it to the extreme, and on a global basis, Rob hopes to show people everywhere that having these diseases or having an ostomy, like Rob does, shouldn’t stop you from leading a full life. You may not be able to climb mountains, but there are so many other things you can do. To further this goal, Rob started the Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society (IDEAS), from his home base in Vancouver, British Columbia.

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