Recovering from Crohns Disease., Some good news out of , as skiing champion Lindsey Vonn has said she is on the road back from a “painful ” that hospitalized her a few weeks back.

Writing for The , Vonn called her illness “very scary,” and conceded that, initially, she wasn’t as concerned about the illness as her doctors. “At first I thought it was just a really bad flu,” she wrote. “I made three visits to the hospital before finally being admitted. They did a bunch of tests, and they were worried that it was Crohn’s disease.”

If the doctors’ diagnosis of Crohn’s disease, which affects the , had been correct, she would have been facing a disease that could have negatively impacted the rest of her career. And, as Vonn noted, other potential were on the table as possibilities as well.

Fortunately, Vonn’s symptoms subsided by a proper combination of . But weariness persisted: “After I got out of the hospital, I was getting tired walking down the hall of my condo, let alone walking up a couple stairs,” she wrote. “I had to stop every five steps. I felt like I was 100 years old, and I couldn’t even think about skiing.”

Read Full Article


Lompoc Record (blog)
Lindsey Vonn: Recovering from her ‘very scary’ illness
Lompoc Record (blog)
If the doctors’ diagnosis of Crohn’s disease, which affects the intestinal tract, had been correct, she would have been facing a disease that could have negatively impacted the rest of her career. And, as Vonn noted, other potential chronic problems
Lindsey Vonn: My pain was ‘out of control’ during hospitalization Larry Brown Sportsall 28 news articles »

About Rob Hill

In 1994, Rob was a fit, healthy 23-year-old, an amateur runner and athlete. Until that time, he had never really been sick. He didn’t even have a regular doctor. When the illness started, it progressed rapidly. Daily diarrhea. Sustained stomach cramps. The diagnosis was Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract. It got worse, and his weight plummeted from 185 to 105 pounds. After a year and a half, it became clear that his large intestine, his colon, needed to be removed. Rob decided he had to do something about it. The Seven Summits campaign, which we call “No Guts Know Glory” grew from Rob’s love of sport, adventure and the outdoors. By taking it to the extreme, and on a global basis, Rob hopes to show people everywhere that having these diseases or having an ostomy, like Rob does, shouldn’t stop you from leading a full life. You may not be able to climb mountains, but there are so many other things you can do. To further this goal, Rob started the Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society (IDEAS), from his home base in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Leave a Reply