Freshman Activist Conversation about Crohns

When freshman Catherine Hartman was diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease in 2005, she says it was not the end of the world—rather, it was the beginning of a journey in which she decided to take charge of the disease and become an advocate for its awareness.

I remember taking part in a walk that my doctor told me about, and I haven’t stopped since then, Hartman says.
Crohn’s Disease is a of the near the colon, slightly similar in symptoms to the disease colitis, and although they affect different parts of the tract, the two are primary forms of , she says.

According to WebMd.com Crohn’s disease can be hereditary, but it could also be the result of an abnormal immune system reaction to bacteria. The website states doctors are unsure of the exact cause. The main symptoms are diarrhea, and weight loss, although some people also experience sores and bowel blockages.


University of Manchester
Freshman activist creates conversation about Crohn’s
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When freshman Catherine Hartman was diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease in 2005, she says it was not the end of the world—rather, it was the beginning of a journey in which she decided to take charge of the disease and become an advocate for its
Manchester leads new international study investigating Inflammatory Bowel EurekAlert (press release)all 2 news articles »

About Rob Hill

In 1994, Rob was a fit, healthy 23-year-old, an amateur runner and athlete. Until that time, he had never really been sick. He didn’t even have a regular doctor. When the illness started, it progressed rapidly. Daily diarrhea. Sustained stomach cramps. The diagnosis was Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract. It got worse, and his weight plummeted from 185 to 105 pounds. After a year and a half, it became clear that his large intestine, his colon, needed to be removed. Rob decided he had to do something about it. The Seven Summits campaign, which we call “No Guts Know Glory” grew from Rob’s love of sport, adventure and the outdoors. By taking it to the extreme, and on a global basis, Rob hopes to show people everywhere that having these diseases or having an ostomy, like Rob does, shouldn’t stop you from leading a full life. You may not be able to climb mountains, but there are so many other things you can do. To further this goal, Rob started the Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society (IDEAS), from his home base in Vancouver, British Columbia.

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